Tutor Trainee Reading Lists

 


Guidelines for Reading Summaries

One of the requirements of membership to the Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators is evidence of completion of the Required Readings at the level for which the trainee is applying.

The Blosser Center has developed the following guidelines for this requirement:

  1. Summaries must be in writing and should be submitted to your supervising Fellow in digital format for approval. Each summary should include the trainee’s name, date, book or article title, and author on the first page. They must be kept on file in digital format.
  2. Summaries should include a minimum of one paragraph for a shorter reading, such as a pamphlet; one substantive paragraph for each chapter of a book.
  3. Summaries should also include a minimum of one paragraph describing the trainee’s personal reactions to the piece. How does the material relate to your past teaching experiences? What can you apply to your current teaching? Do you agree with the views presented? Is there anything you question? Why? How does this material inform your teaching?
  4. In the rare case where the supervising Fellow feels that summaries do not reflect sufficient understanding of the material, they may be returned for revisions.

 

All IDA publications used with permission.


Required Readings/Texts for Classroom Educator Practicum:

  1. Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators (2016). Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators: Overview. Amenia, NY: Author.
  2. Cain, K. (2009. Spring). Making Sense of Text: Skills That Support Text Comprehension and Its Development. Perspectives on Language and Literacy, 29(1), 11-14.
  3. Gillingham, Anna, & Stillman, Bessie. (1997). The Gillingham Manual: Remedial Training for Children with Specific Disability in Reading, Spelling, and Penmanship (8th ed.). Cambridge, MA: Educators Publishing Service. (ISBN-13: 978-0-8388-0200-7, other editions may be substituted.)
    ***The Gillingham Manual will be provided at the start of the course. Specific chapters will be assigned as part of nightly homework during training week.
  4. Hook, P.E. & Jones, S. D. (2004, Spring). The Importance of Automaticity and Fluency for Efficient Reading Comprehension. Perspectives on Language and Literacy, 28(1), 16-21.
  5. The International Dyslexia Association. (2013). Dyslexia in the Classroom:  What Every Teacher Needs to Know.
  6. The International Dyslexia Association. (2016). IDA Fact Sheet: Dyslexia Assessment: What It Is and How It Can Help.
  7. Moats, L. (2005-2005, Winter).  How Spelling Supports Reading. American Educator, 12-22 & 42-43.
  8. Put Reading First: The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read (3rd ed.). (2006). National Institute for Literacy, the Partnership for Reading. LINCS: Literacy Information and Communication System.
  9. Berninger, V.W. (2012, May-June). Strengthening the Mind’s Eye: The Case for Continued Handwriting Instruction in the 21st Century. Principal, 91(5), 28-31. Reprinted with permission. Copyright 2012 National Association of Elementary School Principals. All rights reserved.

 


Required Readings/Texts for Associate Practicum:

  1. Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators (2016). Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators: Overview. Amenia, NY: Author.
  2. Berninger, V.W. (2012, May-June). Strengthening the Mind’s Eye: The Case for Continued Handwriting Instruction in the 21st Century. Principal, 91(5), 28-31. Reprinted with permission. Copyright 2012 National Association of Elementary School Principals. All rights reserved.
  3. Cain, K. (2009. Spring). Making Sense of Text: Skills That Support Text Comprehension and Its Development. Perspectives on Language and Literacy, 29(1), 11-14.
  4. Chall, J. (1983).  Chall’s Stages of Reading Development. From: Chall, J. (1983). Stages of Reading Development. N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Book Company.
  5. Gillingham, Anna, & Stillman, Bessie. (1997). The Gillingham Manual: Remedial Training for Children with Specific Disability in Reading, Spelling, and Penmanship (8th ed.). Cambridge, MA: Educators Publishing Service. (ISBN-13: 978-0-8388-0200-7, other editions may be substituted.)
    ***The Gillingham Manual will be provided at the start of the course. Specific chapters will be assigned as part of nightly homework during training week.
  6. Hook, P.E. & Jones, S. D. (2004, Spring). The Importance of Automaticity and Fluency for Efficient Reading Comprehension. Perspectives on Language and Literacy, 28(1), 16-21. 
  7. The International Dyslexia Association. (2008). IDA Fact Sheet: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) and Dyslexia.
  8. The International Dyslexia Association. (2015). IDA Fact Sheet: Dyslexia and the Brain.
  9. The International Dyslexia Association. (2014). IDA Dyslexia Handbook: What Every Family Should Know.
  10. The International Dyslexia Association. (2013). Dyslexia in the Classroom: What Every Teacher Needs to Know.
  11. The International Dyslexia Association. (2016). IDA Fact Sheet: Dyslexia Assessment: What It Is and How It Can Help.
  12. The International Dyslexia Association (2016). IDA Fact Sheet: Testing and Evaluation.
  13. The International Dyslexia Association. (2012). IDA Fact Sheet: Understanding Dysgraphia.
  14. King, D.H. (2015, April-May). Why Bother with Cursive? The IDA Examiner.
  15. McClelland, J. (1989). Gillingham:  Contemporary After 76 Years. Annals of Dyslexia, 39, 34-49.
  16. Moats, L. (2005-2005, Winter).  How Spelling Supports Reading. American Educator, 12-22 & 42-43.
  17. Put Reading First: The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read (3rd ed.). (2006). National Institute for Literacy, the Partnership for Reading. LINCS: Literacy Information and Communication System.
  18. Sheffield, B. (1991). The Structured Flexibility of Orton-Gillingham. Annals of Dyslexia, 41, 41-53.